MobileEars: An app-based hearing aid

MobileEars: An app-based hearing aid

A lot of people could use some help with their hearing, but getting a hearing aid has traditionally been a big, time-consuming, and expensive step. As we reported earlier, the Oslo-based company Listen have therefore been developing an app in collaboration with SINTEF that turns your iPhone into a hearing aid.

Their first app, MobileEars, was released this week, and is now available for free download from the App Store. You can see a promotional video for the app below the break.

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Proceedings of the 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics

Proceedings of the 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics

The 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics was held at Geilo, Norway from January 31 to February 3, 2016. It was organised by Ulf Kristiansen and Erlend Magnus Viggen, both part of the Acoustics Research Centre. This year we had 48 participants holding 31 presentations, and 9 papers were written for the proceedings, which have been published through arXiv.org.

This link takes you to the proceedings.

Thanks to Sverre Holm and Josephine Børvan for the photo

Program of the 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics

Program of the 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics

The 39th Scandinavian Symposium on Physical Acoustics will be held at Geilo Hotel from January 31st to February 3rd, 2016, and is organised by Ulf Kristiansen and Erlend Magnus Viggen at ARC. This year, there are 50 registered participants who will be holding a total of 32 talks on various topics such as sound propagation, ultrasonics, sonar technology, acoustics in solids, petroleum-related acoustics, and more. You can find the entire conference program below, and a printable version can be downloaded here.

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Presenting the MAUS project on traffic auralisation

Presenting the MAUS project on traffic auralisation

In the MAUS project, we have developed a prototype of a traffic auralisation tool. The idea is to realistically imitate the sound of traffic, to give an idea of how it will sound in cases that have not been realised yet, and to show the effects of various noise-reducing measures. We have previously given a simple description of how the tool works together with sound examples on this blog.

In early December, we presented a paper and a poster on the MAUS auralisation tool at the 18th International Conference on Digital Audio Effects (DAFx-15) here in Trondheim. This conference was organized by the Music Technology and Acoustics groups at NTNU.

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How do you imitate the sound of traffic?

How do you imitate the sound of traffic?

We previously wrote about the MAUS project, where we are building an auralisation tool to simulate the sound from virtual noise sources outdoors in order to give a realistic representation of how a future noise source will sound when it has been developed. One such noise source that we have been working on is traffic, one of the biggest issues in environmental acoustics. But how do you simulate the sound of traffic on a computer?

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MAUS: Auralisation of outdoor noise

MAUS: Auralisation of outdoor noise

Imagine that a new road was planned for construction close to your house. Naturally, you might want to know how much this would impact the noise situation in the area where you live. Currently, what the developers would be able to tell you are numbers called equivalent levels that describe the noise increase in your area. While these numbers may be based on excellent simulations and may be entirely correct, numbers are no substitute for listening!

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